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No.3817

Sup, /civ/. I'm looking for /adv/ from any M-L or M-L-M tendency anons here.

Which social atmosphere, given material conditions, is objectively better for me to effectively organize the highest number of "down for the struggle" classmates and peers around proletarian class interests?

A) local public community college in my town

or

B) semi-local (1 hour drive from my town) private, liberal arts college

Right off the bat I would say A.

My town/community is solidly working-class, and heavily diverse to boot (white, black, Chicano, Samoan, Filipino, Cambodian etc.). So the local community college (and public state college after I transfer) would reflect this.

However, I was (somehow, incredibly) accepted into B) and offered financial aid to attend and B happens to be a prestigious "elite"-tier school.

Of course this does not automatically make me choose B, since I'm not a rat-race, portfolio-building, credential-ist "temporarily frustrated millionaire" with any illusions about the disappearing "American Dream" (if it ever really existed) . I'm not trying to earn my degree to become an Ivy-Tower, detached from the masses academic or a frat-bro Chad finance/industry/corporate STEM-bro.

If anything, I'm heavily deliberating simply because I'm wondering what are the balance of pros/cons between my two options.

Considering that B has substantially more resources/smaller class sizes/yada yada the other material advantages that private liberal arts schools obviously have.

This is probably the only chance I will ever have in my entire life to attend such a school or take advantage of such big-money elite-tier resources.

Plus, Option B has a substantially higher proportion of foreign students (mostly India, China, West Europe, Japan, S. Korea, Vietnam, smaller amounts from Latin America, Africa, Middle East and East Europe).

It'd be cool if a lot of them were ML/MLM or receptive to those ideas and I could build an international network of revolutionary contacts.

But......

What is the probability that a large or even significant proportion of these foreign students would at all be receptive? Or would the overwhelming majority of them be bougie kids so completely antagonistic to working-class/poor peoples' concerns that I'd be isolated and neutered in my effectiveness at organizing any solid/reliable comrades for the next 4 to 5 years of my life?

How critical or important are those elite-tier private liberal arts resources to the overall quality of my college experience, given my specific goals?

I'd love perspectives from Red anons who have attended either or both types of schools. Thank.

  No.3818

I think that you would be able to successfully organize people in A while attending B. I think it's temporarily harder this way but I look at organizing like this: as students we should try to be the best students we can be so we can get a hold of resources to help us build platforms to spread our message. It appears you see things similarly based on what you said here:
>Considering that B has substantially more resources/smaller class sizes/yada yada the other material advantages that private liberal arts schools obviously have.
Now things in your situation may be significantly different from mine but in the city I attend Uni at there are a couple of nearby community colleges and I have still been able to organize with them despite going to different schools.

  No.3819

>>3818

>as students we should try to be the best students we can be so we can get a hold of resources to help us build platforms to spread our message


What are concrete examples of the specific kinds of resources that would help us build platforms to spread our message?

You mean, like, presses for printing pamphlets or?

I'm not sure if I'm following exactly.