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No.6783

So do you think we are winning on any fronts in the wars of the internet? (I understand that this will mean different things for different people but write what you want and what is happening ).

We have Edward Snowden from the NSA/GHCQ/others hacked pretty much everything. We have the CIA Vault 7 that pretty much shows the same thing.

Vault 7 " U.S. Consulate in Frankfurt is a covert CIA hacker base". And Germany is supposed to be in the forefront of privacy?
https://wikileaks.org/ciav7p1/
I remember them being in with BND after Snowden.

Copyright isn't going well, more and more is removed, more and more things are brought to trial.
https://torrentfreak.com/save-the-meme-campaign-protests-eus-proposed-piracy-filters-170308/
"One of the most discussed proposals is the requirement for online services to install mandatory piracy filters"

https://torrentfreak.com/google-anti-piracy-agreement-will-target-domain-hopping-share-search-data-170307/
" the search engines will "exchange detailed information" with rightsholders "on a confidential basis" in order to better understand how users are searching for content."

Net Neutrality in Europe is a mess, in America things are happening at the moment.

Facebook/google/windows/apps collect more data than ever.
Intel Management Engine, UEFI, baseband and so on.
Smartphones are all a mess security wise.


So can you come with any ideas of things going well to keep me from being completely cynical?
Not just temporary wins, but where we are actually moving in the right direction?

Also feel free to post things I missed.

  No.6785

>>6783
I agree that unfortunately in alot of ways non-freedom respecting software is dominating. Reason being mostly convenience: Sure you can get a Laptop that runs on entirely free software. But doing the research and work to get to that level is way beyond the scope of most people.

But look on the bright side: It's very common for FOSS developer tools, server software, programming languages, etc to be superior to their proprietary alternatives:
nginx/apache > IIS, Linux > Windows, MariaDB > MSSQL. I tried thinking of more proprietary alternatives of the tools I use daily but I couldn't name any more. So yeah I think at least developers are very free in alot of ways.
I know I'm only talking about FLOSS vs Proprietary but I think it plays a big role in regaining ones freedom.

I'm happy at least Tor exists as Net Neutrality will inevitably crumble, even here in Switzerland it's starting. It seems people will vote for anything as long as you claim it's to fight terrorism.

  No.6791

>>6785
>programming languages
didn't C# just get open-sourced or something? Not sure how big of a win that is but it's one less proprietary thing in the world.
>>6783
As for the state of the internet, I'm looking at the situation this way to keep me from losing my soykaf: there are still people on the inside who want the general populace to know what their government is doing. Even if they have ulterior motives themselves, the information is still trickling down to us poor plebs.
As for actually fixing any of it, we have to be aware of problems to fix them. Now that we know the TLAs have almost literally hacked the planet, we can start taking open hardware and software seriously. We know they're actually infiltrating communities, so we know the general "fuarrrk off wage slave" mindset is useful. We know they're making memes, but they don't seem to be on the cutting edge of that yet considering how weaponized autism won the election.
As for copyright, all I can think of is learning from people who made it their mission and admitted defeat: http://fffff.at/rip/

  No.6793

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>>6791
>didn't C# just get open-sourced or something?
Programming languages can't be copyrighted or patented and the like; the implementations of the languages can be, however, which is what happened if Microsoft freed their C# soykaf. Though, Mono has been around awhile and is an alternative to Microsoft's implementation but was never quite feature-parity considering that the draw of Microsoft's C# was its interoperability with .NET and other proprietary frameworks.

>>6783
>So can you come with any ideas of things going well to keep me from being completely cynical?
>Not just temporary wins, but where we are actually moving in the right direction?
No, sadly. Things may get a bit better hardware-wise if more powerful, open ARM chips come to laptops/desktops but that's only part of the ongoing war for user freedom and Internet freedom. I hate to say it but the only way to fix the systemic issues is by revolution. Blood will need to be shed in order to depose those who support these abrogations on human rights, as well as destroying the facilities that make surveillance possible (e.g. Fort Meade, AT&T's Manhatten tower*, etc.).

The question is, are you willing to die to force these changes? And if so, when? How much worse do things need to get before getting to the point where you would agree to violent revolution?

* https://theintercept.com/2016/11/16/the-nsas-spy-hub-in-new-york-hidden-in-plain-sight/

  No.6794

>>6793
>are you willing to die to force these changes?
No. The likelihood of a future with an internet devoid of all freedoms is just as small as one that is completely free. In reality we are going to meet somewhere in the middle, and as time stretches onward forces on both sides will cause the "middle ground" to fluctuate from being more restrictive to being more free, just like everything else in life that involves a fight between protection of liberty and government control. The protection of certain liberties should be expect expected just as much as the enactment of certain restrictions should be. To suggest violence due to this process is ridiculous.

  No.6795

File: 1489037617390.png (1 MB, 231x300, powell_manifesto.pdf)

>>6794
>The likelihood of a future with an internet devoid of all freedoms is just as small as one that is completely free. In reality we are going to meet somewhere in the middle, and as time stretches onward forces on both sides will cause the "middle ground" to fluctuate from being more restrictive to being more free

That's an overly idealistic portrayal of the world we live in. "Middle grounds" created from oppositional forces are not an inherent property of the world we live in when applied to complex systems such as governance. Even currently with the freedom we have, whether solely concerning the Internet or not, there is no "middle ground" to be seen. In what way is the centralization of Internet services/resources, monopolistic control of the very lines that allow us to have this very conversation, and widespread governmental surveillance in any way offset by what we're free to do and say _now_?

Barring violent action, there is no way to push back against the forces that are working /at this very moment/ to control access to information and the sources from which you can pull. It seems almost a natural tendency of governments to become more tyrannical as they age, what with the passage of legislation being more numerous than their removal. Your supposed "middle ground" that you refer to relies on the presumption that one side will not become too strong and remove all possibility of pushing back in a manner consistent with the ruling class' preferences. When this happens that middle ground moves, yes, but it moves in one direction more or less permanently (again, barring social upheaval).

>The protection of certain liberties should be expect expected just as much as the enactment of certain restrictions should be. To suggest violence due to this process is ridiculous.


This view is inconsistent with reality; in what period of history have people not had to ultimately resort to violence to overcome the domination of their oppressors? If what you say were true then civilizations should have never fell in the past, civil wars never waged, and tyrants never executed. What I'm saying is that we've entered a period where righting these wrongs, among others, simply cannot be accomplished within the system forced upon us in its current state. Complete regulatory capture and corporate control of government has ensured this outcome. Not to mention the threat of total surveillance poses a grave threat to all future movements whose views do not coincide with those of the ruling class.

Without privacy and the ability to share our ideas with others freely--publicly or privately--there is no possibility of moving that demarcation you speak of. And our rulers are well aware of this.

  No.6798

Lainchan is still here, and still comfy.
That's a win

Linux is getting better by the day in terms of usability and support for decent applications.

I'm sure BSD is something, who fuarrrking cares

If it all crumbles, we can still come hang out here, and talk about cybersoykaf together.

  No.6812

Encryption. Look at the push towards ssl, and axolotl/signal and how many examples of the importance of strong crypto have come to light. most phones now come from the factory with disk encryption Even big companies are pushing for it / popularizing / normalizing it in their own ways.

I think security is getting better too. Especially now that most OS use the rolling update model. I feel like vault7 proved that it's getting more expensive for governments to monitor / hack people and the evidence is in the types of targeted attacks / exploits that the cia is having to use.

HR387 an email bill saying email older than 180 days will need a warrant to be searched was recently (unanimously ) voted through to congress in the u.s..

things like openbazaar popping up as tor is getting more exposure and bitcoin has been getting national coverage for a long time and especially now that the SEC made a consideration of an ETF on it. (even though it wasnt approved the path forward for cryptocurrencies is now clear for the long-term future)

some new dnssec rfc's being discussed too.

You're right though, there is a lot of bad stuff happening right now. That's why it's important to talk to your representatives and inform everyone you can.