[ art / civ / cult / cyb / diy / drg / feels / layer / lit / λ / q / r / sci / sec / tech / w / zzz ] archive provided by lainchan.jp

lainchan archive - /cyb/ - 31206



File: 1466106036686.png (99.74 KB, 300x211, bodyhacking-vs-biohacking.jpg)

No.31206

Anyone familiar with biohacking / bodyhacking here?
Or brain enchaned drugs?
Also pic.

  No.31218

http://biohack.me
Great forum I used to be apart of. Some guys there implanted Arduino boards under his arm, and another group was injecting vitamin C or something into their eyeballs to make their night sight better. It worked, apparently.

  No.31234

noots general is over at >>>drg/2654

lets all build north paws and hack our sensoriums

  No.31235

>>31234
sorry idk how to link to other boards

  No.31239

>>31235
Lemme try: >>>/drg/2654

So what I want to have is as follows:

1; Myoelectric Sensor Pads
Gets expensive when /diy/ing, as quality amplifier ICs seem to be made of gold with those prices concerning name-brands like Linear and Analog. Existing solutions like that arm-band thing simply called "myo" does all the heavy lifting, but is expensive and doesn't utilize BTLE, so the on-time is shit.

2; Data Gloves
More of a peripheral, but it would make sense to starting it slow.
Easily made, good to include are haptics along with the necessary strain sensors.
This can be achieved either by using proper sensor strips, or for the dollar on the dime as outlined here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkPekPiA-sc

3; Automatic Medical Assistance by utilizing Intravenous Injection Catheters
Think Gordon Freemans' HEV Suit, but without morphine.
Don't worry, my Waifu is working with a medical professional on this,
for quite a while now actually.
Nothing promising as of yet, currently my Waifu reverse-engineered a catheter pads' internal flow-rate sensor. It's on the bucket list, keeping it safe, slow and steady.
Also don't jam needles into your forearms with dubious liquids kids.
My Waifu won't conduct dangerous experiments on any human being, so should you.
Don't try this at home obviously without medical advice and assistance.

  No.31240

>>31239

> Without morphine

Then demerol? Dialudid?

  No.31242

>>31240
Saline solution currently.
What will be used depends on factors which are not in my Waifus field of expertise, so this question cannot be answered on the spot.
Maybe she can go ask later this month.

  No.33151

don't die on me yet biohacking thread

how could you make an implant that communicates the passage of time through a day?

  No.33165

>>31218
Jesus I want to try the nightvision thing but that must hurt. How did he do it?

  No.33171

>>33151
Maybe you could implant a little controller with a buzzer that vibrates lightly every full minute. It would be annoying at first but surely would become second nature very fast.
Where to put it though?

  No.33187

>>33171

I saw a post on another forum that suggested increasing the frequency of a vibration over the course of an hour, so that you know roughly what minute it is and know when the hour changes, but the problem with all these implanted vibrators is that it'd be hell to power them. As cyb as it would be I don't really want to have to charge my leg just yet.

For an implant like this I imagine anywhere would work; you don't need a lot of nerve endings to detect a vibration.

I wonder if you could do something with an implanted electrode or similar that would more gently stimulate a nearby nerve; this would use less power but would it be as effective?

I think the problem with doing it every minute is that then you know a minute has passed, but what time is it?

  No.33345

>Both
huh, so that's how venn diagrams work.

  No.33360

>>33187
Would be pretty neat to have the time (or some other numerical info) in binary across all your fingertips. Best would be to have it on request I think, instead of every minute/constantly.

  No.33459

>>33187

Any form of motor will be hell to power. Yeah, using some sort of EMS would be pretty effective - I'd wonder whether the implant region would become overstimulated and stop responding though if it was continuous. Some form of morse/tap code would probably be more effective, and open it up to all sorts of other covert communication stuff.

You're going to have to charge it anyway, but as long as it's minimal enough you could probably get away with some sort of nightly short-range wireless charging system like a coil you tape over the implant.

  No.33470

>>33360
I want to have an intuitive knowledge of absolute and relative time, not something I have to read. When you enhance your sensorium you open yourself up to whole new levels of awesome shit.

>>33459
You'd have to modulate it. If it was kinetic I don't think you'd ever attenuate it away fully but I'm not sure how EMS would work in that respect. Only one way to find out...

  No.33486

File: 1468956594219.png (39.83 KB, 200x141, 1466168429720.jpg)

All technology of the last 100 years should be destroyed, with exception of certain parts of medical technology.

  No.33500

>>31206
Some bodybuilding and nootropics, so far. But not much of cybernetics, this part is still sci-fi part for me

  No.33512

File: 1468984177823.png (214.2 KB, 200x150, Disgust.gif)

>>33486
How did this guy get in? Who left the peanut jar open?

Perhaps a friendly troll? Or a legitimate Luddite.

  No.33513

File: 1468984512897.png (55.7 KB, 200x140, scivsengineer.jpg)

I terms of cybernetics, I have finger tip magnets, and a trauma chip that monitors my heart rate and blood pressure for anomalies and reports this information back to my doctor and hospitals in my vicinity.

It runs on a 1.8 volt button battery and is supposed to last for 3 to 5 years.

The item itself cost me about 300 dollars to have my watchmaker friend produce and another 1000 to have implanted and connected to the local hospitals.

  No.33516

>>33513
Why not just connect it to a nuke

  No.33555

File: 1469044075918.png (290.3 KB, 200x85, 1466615072401.jpg)

>>33512
I'm a bona fide cyber-luddite. You have to fight fire with fire. To me it seems strange how technophiles can be anarchists. I might seem paradox to you, but you guys engage in an even weirder paradox.

  No.33557

>>33555
pffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffffff

  No.33558

>>33555
Riddle me THIS. I always wondered how someone could see anarchism as a permanent answer, wouldnt eventually the person who comes out on top just enforce their own laws? Itd have to be super rooted in tradition or something right?

  No.33560

>>33558
>Itd have to be super rooted in tradition or something right?

pretty much. The idea is that there would be a consensus to keep things leaderless.

  No.33561

>>33560
You think thats possible? I honestly dont know, ive seen it happen on small scale and in simulation (vidya games, websites and such) where people agree to not enforce laws and such as its the culture. Still I wonder if that would still happen when real shit is at stake. Or if someone would take advantage of it all and play on a group of safety over freedom type peoples fears.

  No.33562

>>33561
>>33560
I'm asking myself pretty much the same. I can't imagine any situation where people won't form inner circles.

Where there are groups of people, there are leaders of people.
Even if just for short amounts of time.
It would take everyone to be lone wolfs to make it a leaderless world.

  No.33563

>>33165
(not OP) It's actually a specific form of vitamin A. You have to take quite a bit of it everyday on a strict regiment. Once you stop the taking the vitamin, the infrared night vision goes away very quickly, though it wasn't too powerful in the first place. You can get sick from it as well if you're not very careful.

  No.33565

>>33561
worked okay-ish in Spain for about a year, before the CNT and the Bolsheviks split and the fascists won. That's pretty much the largest-scale real-life experiment with anarchism ever.

  No.33569

File: 1469057399026.png (38.88 KB, 200x112, gendodisturbed.gif)

>>33555

Wednesday July, 20th, Commanders log...

"Today I was accused of being both an anarchist and a technophile due to the projections of a proud hipster. The strangeness of this specimen only grows as i consider it further. My research shall continue."

:End Log:

tfw >not anarchist
tfw >some anon is cognitively dissonant

meh, carry on.

  No.33570

>>33569
>>33565
>>33562
>>33561
>>33560
>>33558
>>33555
please have your anarchism 101 discussion in another thread, this is about biohacking

if you disagree with the concept of biohacking, make a luddism thread

  No.33581

>>33570
will do.

So, one thing I think doesn't get mentioned enough in these conversations: what about glitches? Consider this: humans have had billions of years to evolve. That involved lots of bugfixes and workarounds. I think that going down the transhuman route could cause some problems, in that the human body has seen quite a lot of testing that no mod would be able to match. What if it fails in a critical moment?

  No.33582

>>33581
>What if *a mod fails in a critical moment?

  No.33612

>>33600
God only punishes if you truly wish to be punished by them.

>>33581
This is why there exist a plethora of certifications and regulations for such cases to never occur. The ideal of a perfect mod thus can only be approached by the thousand by million of collective man-hours available to the big corporations.

Not saying that it is achievable by a small collective to meet this standards, but it is certainly approachable by careful testing beforehand and keeping the complexity down.

  No.33622

>>33612
I'm just saying, mods will always come with problems, and it's reasonable to assume that for the truly cutting-edge where will be significant bugs.

  No.33642

>>33581
The human body is a scrapheap made out of a barely correcting process that selects for base survivability, not optimality. There's plenty of low-hanging fruit and room for improvement. That's why almost all humans end up deaf, arthritic, blind, etc..

Please just ignore the troll, it's a fun roleplay but let's not indulge her.

  No.33649

File: 1469149327429.png (4.77 MB, 200x133, Protocol 4 - Dolphins.webm)

>>33581

Underr6ed post.

If you think about it in the context of the environmental vacuum of space many of our basic metabolic requirements are a glitch.

We've spent billions of years evolving in a bubble. If that bubble ever pops, we're going to have to make some very advanced, rapid evolutionary changes in order to survive.

  No.33651

>>33642
>That's why almost all humans end up deaf, arthritic, blind, etc..

because we outlive the timespan we evolved for? Yeah, but our base traits are pretty fucking well-tested. And at least we know the flaws, and we've been trying to fix them for centuries. With a sufficiently modded body, it's unlikely we'd know even what the problems are, much less how to solve them.

  No.33661

File: 1469156822282.png (3.67 MB, 200x200, 1-s2.0-S0092867400802093-main (1).pdf)

>>33640
bible verses do not grant credibility to your concern.

technology is technology no matter its application domain and is subject to regulation and law associated with any rapidly evolving human process.

it is therefore not unreasonable to disregard failures as we often do with defects in any other product. Return or repair the broken item, and claim your warranty. Frankly, I wish my body came with a warranty in the event of age related damages.

But this is all far flung speculation.

This is a modern bio hacking thread, not trans-humanism 101.

How about that bone density modification in mouse subjects?

maybe we could put CRISPR to work doing this modification to people?

  No.33669

File: 1469160590185.png (2.54 MB, 200x104, ░▒▓▃▖▙▃▁ ▝▘▁▗▇▗▝▓▒░.gif)

>>33661

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spaceflight_osteopenia, selectively modifying bone density would be extremely useful for living in conditions of reduced or increased gravity.

  No.33670

>>33661
Humans are categorically different from machines and should be treated as such. If you do not agree with that statement, then I guess some of those claims about atheists made in low quality tracts are true after all.

  No.33671

>>33661
please don't respond to shitposts.

  No.33672

>>33651
Well, it's more common than that. Even younger people have back pain because all of our body weight is localized onto a single monolithic spine. Any civeng undergrad could design a better weight distribution structure.

That also said, your speculation is off-topic for this thread, which is about practical biohacking, which is far below the level you're operating at. The expectation is for implants to glitch. They're made by hobbyists and typically have a lifespan of months.

  No.33681

>>33672
bah. Too lazy to make a different thread. Also, the spine works pretty well given the requirements.

>>33669
You could drill tiny holes in your bones and fill them with a dense foam, I suppose, although you'd have to think of some way to get to the bone without disrupting the muscles. For making less-dense bones you could just leave them full of air.

  No.33710

>>33670
>Humans are categorically different from machines
based on what categories?

  No.33715

For this discussion of transhumanism.living forever is kind of a dream of mine, but in the same way I might distrust christianities promises of immortality after death, i might distrust sciences. Though you can argue about one being more reasonable, or souls not existing, ultimately its a leap of faith. My consciousness or soul, something i dont fully understand is whats at stake. Much to be gained much to be lost.

I think for decisions like this its best to trust intuition, by most religious standards id be acting upon my natural sense of right and wrong, and by evolutions my natural instincts of survival. (Note not saying its a compromise, just i think its a reasonable approaxh from many angles) So I cant say for sure till its presented to me, but i can still think about it. Ive noticed this idea becoming prominent reflects something potentially dangerous or interesting. I think it must be one of two things but there could be more im not considering.

1. Our thought has developed so far it doesnt see itself as needing a brain or body to function. If we were to die that is we would continue thinking, at least thats what our brain unconsciously thinks. This idea of transhumanism is a manifestation of that unconscious thought. Possibly thats right and there is something science hasnt accounted for yet and will be clear when transhumanism succeeds. Or it isnt and its a deep rooted problem

2. Science is now or soon to be revered as much as religion in our minds. We have little to no doubts that it can succeed at making us greater than human. If it ends up not succeeding maybe an entirely new way of solving problems and thinking will be born? If it succeeds science would likely be proven supreme to many in doubt.

anyways. thats,just my thoughts on it, as for biohacking in general some things are neat. Magnet thing would be cool, like gaining another sense. I mean sure its just a magnet in your fingertip but eventually it would feel like a real sense. I wouldnt want it on my fingertip though, unless i got one on each finger. It just doesnt feel authentic otherwise if you know what i mean. Its not like a REAL sense; my magnet sense resides on my right index finger. Maybe its just me.

  No.33723

>>33555
this is the most retarded fucking image I have ever seen. Please go away troll.

  No.33746

>>33681

this wouldn't work (the foam thing). Bones are porous because several key cell types are generated within the bone marrow. Admittedly most of the active bone marrow resides in the torso, however, then you'd have to contend with your immune system's response to a foreign object.

  No.33747

>>33710
Having Souls. Capable of empathy for example

  No.33753

>>33723
>Please go away troll.
Friendly reminder that reacting to the trollpost means the troll won. As a syndicalist I thought it's actually pretty funny.

>>33670
>Humans are categorically different from machines and should be treated as such. If you do not agree with that statement, then I guess some of those claims about atheists made in low quality tracts are true after all.
Full disclosure: I am an, for a lack of better word an atheist - I don't care enough to go full anti-theist, sucking on Dawkins and Harris dick every time I open my mouth. I don't consider myself a "good person" by any common definition. I don't care about it too because most of these definitions are worth shit. I consider secular humanist and every other kind of humanism in history to be an empty ideology that came into existence and was allowed to flourish mostly because it's politically useful for certain contenders of the great game of power struggles, much like theistic religion themselves. The bottom line is: you can shame some atheists into submitting to your ideological framework, notabene heavily overlapping their own due to historical reasons, but you can do it with all of them. You can't do it with me for example, because I don't care.

>>33747
>Capable of empathy for example.
Is empathy different than making a mental model for other people's thoughts and feelings and "trying it out" in a manner of speaking? I don't know if it is, but it seems possible that it isn't, so I'll asume there is no categorical mistake. To be fair, it should be possible to draw a line between between static, artificial mechanism that requires maintenance and dynamical, spontaneously evolved and self-repairing organism, but not really in the realm of mental faculties, unless you believe that there's something supernatural about them...

>Having Souls.

...Which you actually might believe. I would say that you either insist on very unsophisticated vocabulary or have very naive philosophical views. I'm not all for reductive naturalism myself, but for me talking about souls in this day and age is just silly.

  No.33755

>>33746
no, I mean in the hard/spongy bone, not the core. They would have to be microscopic holes.

  No.33758

>>33755

Yes I understand that. Coming from someone who has a reaction to the pin placed and s pongy graft placed over my ankle (bone repair), my immune system began attacking it. I had to stay in traction instead for several months until it healed on its own.

This will be your main struggle with implanting large contiguous devices and that's how the immune system perceives it. Generally most implants are well tolerated by the general population, but it can result in deadly forms of inflammation or cysts forming around any implant should the immune system feel the need to "protect itself"

  No.33766

guys who suggested CRISPR bone density aug here...

found this this morning.

pretty sweet stuff...anyone considering applying as a test subject for this kind of thing?

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2016-07-chinese-team-human-crispr-trial.html

  No.33856

>>33766
>applying as a test subject for CRISPR
Probably not. As a test subject I figure you'd have no input on what is being tested what so ever.
Plus the fact that foreign proteins can really do a number on your body, worse than any mechanical argumentation doesn't help the fact.

Unless one's life would be cut short by a genetic disease or cancer anyway, there are hardly arguments for serving as a lab rat in my opinion.

I do agree on testing on embryos pre fetal stage when there is a certainty of curing a genetic disease. It's common practice anyway by now to diagnose fertilized eggs for the purpose of preventing a miserable life.

  No.33895

>>33766
in the same thread where people post the unabomber someone suggests applying for human experimentation.

relly makes u think

  No.34122

File: 1469509181561.png (232.02 KB, 200x182, GOAbcxh.png)

Closest thing I've done is chipped both my hands. 13.56MHz NFC in my left, 125kHz RFID in my right.

And before someone comments, I was tenting my skin with tape earlier on, the picture is just from when I removed that upon entry to get a better look at things.

  No.34124

>>34122
can you reliably unlock a phone with the NFC? also, can you use it for payments?

  No.34129

>>34124

Unlocking, yes. It's what I primarily use for that. I also use the data portion to store contact info and I've had other people scan it for that amongst other things. Believe it or not at one point I wrote fake medical information to it, threw a fake DoB in there somewhere, and used it as a fake ID. Shit has come in handy.

As of now I don't see any way I can use it to make payments though. Pretty sure that'd require cooperation on the end of the financial institution involved.

  No.34131

>>33672
well if the legs were lost ( preferable to amputation ) then muscle density would increase in upper thigh muscles and lower and upper glute muscles. ) which in a standing elevation even with prosthetic, would help your body handle the large top by structuring more lower shape.

  No.34265

File: 1469739513576.png (14.01 KB, 200x132, ov-chipcard-amsterdam.jpg)

>>34129
public transport often times use nfc now.

  No.34307

>>34265
OV-Shitkaart. /cyber/punk als de tering, want je kan er illegaal geld op zetten.

OV-Shitcard. /cyber/punk as fuck because you can illegaly put money on it.

  No.34318

File: 1469830768166.png (181.23 KB, 200x108, 26-00892-2016-13.jpg)

>>34307
free rides? nice.

  No.34321

>>34307
Mooi spul inderdaad, nu alleen nog direct opwaarderen met bitcoins!

  No.34534

>>34129
>Believe it or not at one point I wrote fake medical information to it, threw a fake DoB in there somewhere, and used it as a fake ID. Shit has come in handy

that's sick as fuck lain. who was implant-based ID?

  No.34749

Moved to >>>/diy/2262.