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lainchan archive - /lit/ - 4967



File: 1485299553036.png (6.55 KB, 300x150, Oekaki.png)

No.4967

My parents offered me $100 to spend on computer science/IT related textbooks because I showed interest in the field, what should I get?

Things to keep in mind:

I'm a bit of a brainlet
I don't have much programming experience (Intro level Python)
and I'm not that good at math.

  No.4968

>>4967
>computer science/IT related textbooks

IMO this is a mistake.
Pirate digital versions instead.
Get an e-reader if you really must.

  No.4969

>>4967

The structure and interpretation of computer programs!

also print out a copy of "Programming from the ground up"

  No.4970

>>4968
I have begun reading CODE on a digital version, but I wouldn't mind having actual books around. I don't really talk to my parents/don't see them often, and they are extremely wealthy, while I am not.. but it's their card/they are the ones ordering it, so I'd prefer just to take the free soykaf while I can.

  No.5156

>>4967
Buy an e-reader with the money and get everything from Library Genesis.
Though I personally read CS books on a computer, so I can have my editor and terminal on the side while I read.
E-reader is fun to have for literature in general.

If you want to learn about how computers work from the ground up, The Elements of Computing Systems a.k.a NAND to Tetris is very enlightening.

For Computer Science, Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs is one of the core books, alongside Introduction to Algorithms.

  No.5157

You don't even need physical textbooks to get started. I'm assuming you're a complete beginner to computer programming.

There's lots of free resources available online, some of which are honestly better than textbooks. Yes, even SICP.

Give those a try first before you spend someone else's money on it.