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No.5325

Instead of perpetuate the tradition and opress the opressed, some powerful men (like Kennyo Hongenji in Japan, Artigas in South America and Lenin in Russia) choose to take side with the opressed and help them with their cause.
Why?

  No.5327

soykaf thread
Nice propaganda

Start with better topic next time
Probably suggest something by Julius Evola

  No.5328

>>5325
If we were in Lenin's Russia, every one of us on lainchan would be sent to gulag no doubt.

  No.5329

>>5328

You mean Stalin's Russia, not Lenin's. Lenin was pretty chill.

  No.5331

>>5327
No propaganda intended. Remove the examples if you wish.
This was a serious question.
>>5328
I doubt that's an answer to my question.

  No.5332

>>5325
A code of ethics.
Cultural relativism has been proven to be nonexistant concerning ethical matters, nearly every culture in the world has taken the same base values to the core regarding human dignity.

Those born into a higher class can mindlessly accept their social circumstances, and perpetuate what is taught them (terrorists accepting support from their peers and being seen as heroes by a certain community), or they can iterate on the status quo by combining their experiences with reason.

These powerful men made a realization about the potential of a human being through the combination of deep thought, immersion in literature and/or personal experiences.
They recognized the value of human wellbeing and happiness that outweighed the repercussions of challenging the standard, while also being in a position of power where they were able to fight against the norm.

Next to being exemplary human beings (you would need to be prolific in many fields to become a revolutionary) they also all display a strong adherence to a certain morality, which drives them and their actions.
I myself do not agree with their views, nor the means through which they tried to accomplish these, yet I don't think anyone is able to say that these leaders were not commendable and exemplary men in nearly every facet of their being.

  No.5339

>>5332
What do you mean by exemplary? I suppose it depends on who we're talking about. Thomas Sankara was apparently gifted with an unusual amount of integrity, so that would make him exemplary.