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No.1079

Today I had a really fun dream, in which I was more or less forced to take part in some kind of social activity game, where I get tasks and deadlines on my smartphone from some entity, just like in Gatchaman Crowds or Higashi no Eden. Also I was on the run from the police for some unknown reason and got to enter some shady group in the slums of this city.

This dream kinda made me want to dream more and longer. All my dreams seem to end after roughly 5 actions or place-changes, which should amount to maybe 5-10minutes in-dream time, but when I wake up it feels much shorter.

I remember one dream in which I thought years had passed, but sadly after waking up this feeling stopped.

I want to feel like I was days or weeks in another world. Can I somehow prolong dreams? I mean, I sleep 8 hours from which roughly 20% are REM-Phase, so I should dream 90min, yet I only remember 5 minutes ... Is this only a matter of remembering and training (e.g. with a dream diary)? Or do I need to become lucid to prolong my dreams.

  No.1080

In my case, I remember more of my dreams when I take a short nap.
A couple days ago I slept for an hour and had a long and above-average-complexity dream, in which in a moment I went to sleep and had a second-layer dream, in the middle of that one I became lucid but only for seconds because a character from the first-layer (non-lucid) dream was hitting me on my sleep. I felt the pain in the lucid dream and woke up to the non-lucid one, where another character explained why this other guy hit me and woke me up, then the dream went on until I woke up to real life. The zero-layer dream?

I've been remembering more and having sporadic and short lucid ones since I started my dream journal, but couldn't do any *ILD techniques because it keeps me from falling asleep; I can't relax and do the lucid-dream induction at the same time.

Two things I should note:
I'm not trying to have longer dreams, I'm trying to archieve this >>955
I usually take a nap when I'm very tired, so I'd fall asleep faster and remember my dreams when the alarm goes off like an hour later.

  No.1904

it would be great to prolong dream-time without extending (or shortening) sleep-time. many of my dreams seem cutoff, like they ended abruptly before completely developing (maybe that's on purpose?)

  No.1907

>>1079
Basically no. Your dreams really are about 5 minutes long. It's just that you have about 15 of them a night. Inception was totally full of soykaf as far as time goes (along with just about everything else).

>I remember one dream in which I thought years had passed, but sadly after waking up this feeling stopped.

It's entirely possible that the story of a dream spans multiple years but this is mostly achieved through time skips and false memories. Well noticed by the way, most people remain fooled by this even after they wake up.

>Is this only a matter of remembering and training (e.g. with a dream diary)? Or do I need to become lucid to prolong my dreams.

Though I've never heard of anyone attempting to prolong their dreams without lucidity I can see no strong reason it shouldn't work. At the same time, it seems a difficult task. There's just not an easy way to train yourself (that I can think of. If you think of something sensible, any sort of reinforcement, it will probably work). I'd go with the lucidity option, if only because lucidity is a nice thing to learn anyway.

>>1080
>I remember more of my dreams when I take a short nap
Very normal. You wake up faster and don't have as much time to forget them. Alarm clocks, or just training to wake up at the right time, can produce a similar effect. Also, the dreams we have napping are quite different, that we aren't sleeping as deeply goes a long way to making our dreams more "normal" (i.e. closer to reality or daydreams).

>I can't relax and do the lucid-dream induction at the same time.

Induction really isn't so great. It works and everything but I find reality checks to be much better. First induction is going to leave you napping and like I say that makes a difference. Also, there's a lesson in the first time you do a reality check when you're just 100% sure you're awake and find that you're not and then realise that you've been stood on top of a mountain of ice cream talking to a flying deck chair for the past 5 minutes and how the fuarrrk did you not notice before?

>I'm trying to archieve this >>955

Be careful. Sleep is a thing we don't entirely understand. It has many phases and while some don't seem to be that necessary (REM being the only one we cannot do without in the short term). It's hard to say what purpose they really have. Doing things like this is going to totally mess with the normal cycle. That guy probably does REM for almost all of the night but, as such, there's a number of other phases that are being missed and I imagine all of his dreams were like naps. Don't get me wrong that doesn't mean it's a bad idea to do it but, personally, I would definitely avoid doing it every night.

>>1904
>many of my dreams seem cutoff
This is selection bias. If we sleep and wake naturally we tend not to remember dreams at all. It's only the ones that get cut off that we're likely to remember, hence the appearance.

  No.1908

>>1907
>Also, the dreams we have napping are quite different
That's a good entry for a dream journal.

>I find reality checks to be much better.

Found the same thing. Journal + reality checks and dream signs to start getting lucid sometimes and learn how to control oneself and the environment, induction can be good once you know your way around your dreams.

>induction is going to leave you napping

What does that mean?

>how the fuarrrk did you not notice before?

It happens to me that flying is a totally normal thing to do in my dreams, but only when I change my direction in mid-fly/jump I realise that that's not possible IRL and conclude that I must be dreaming.

>Be careful.

I gave that a rest, still want to learn it sometime and experiment for myself.

  No.1909

>>1908
>induction is going to leave you napping
>What does that mean?
Just that you'll be sleeping lightly like you would while napping. In both cases, you skip over the earlier phases of sleep that really pull you down. Dreams like this are often a lot more vivid and easier to control but they're also much more... formulaic? I suppose. It's hard to find a good word for this. Suffice to say they are different though it should be noted that depending on what you're doing this difference is not always relevant. If you are lucid, have very good control (enough that it doesn't matter how difficult it is) and choose to control every aspect of the dream then it should be much the same.